Emotional Intelligence

Why should I measure my Emotional Intelligence

Everyone has emotions. It‘s a simple fact – a part of our being human. And whether we realise it or not, these emotions impact us every day. They also impact those around us, both in the workplace and in our personal lives.

Think about it for a moment. Think of a time when you experienced an emotion; for example, joy. Perhaps you had a great weekend or accomplished a difficult task at work. How did this emotion impact your mood, your energy levels and the conversations you had with friends or co-workers? Now think of a different emotion; for example, anger. Perhaps a co-worker said something that ‘rubbed you the wrong way‘ or you thought that a friend betrayed a confidence. How did this emotion impact your mood and your behaviours? Perhaps you sent an angry email or said something in the heat of the moment that you later regretted.

Emotional Intelligence in Recruitment

Organisations are integrating Emotional Intelligence into Recruitment when selecting and hiring new employees, through to development and talent management initiatives in human resources, through to transitioning people into other positions.

Emotionally Intelligent Workplace Behaviour

Who wouldn’t want a higher level of emotional intelligence? Studies have shown that high levels of emotional intelligence boost career success, mental health, relationship satisfaction, humour, and happiness. Higher levels of Emotionally Intelligent Workplace Behaviour is also the best antidote to work stress and building your personal resilience. So can you improve your emotional intelligence and how best is this done?

Emotionally Intelligent Leadership

Leaders in business looking to improve their organisation’s performance can do so by improving their emotional intelligence: that is, their skill at identifying, understanding and influencing emotion.

There is a direct link between the way people feel and the way they perform at work. This is one of the most robust and consistent findings in organisational research. In high performing organisations people feel significantly more engaged, cared for, valued, proud, and motivated than those in low performing organisations. Conversely, in low performing organisations people feel significantly more fearful, stressed, disempowered and uncertain.

Leadership is fundamentally about facilitating performance. Research has proven that a leader’s emotional intelligence is key to their capacity to facilitate emotions in others that drive high performance and employee engagement. This is more than just a moral compass; it’s also a recipe for success. Organisations with emotionally intelligent leaders achieve a critical lever of sustainable competitive advantage: a high performance culture and customer loyalty.

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